Inspiration is Critical to Design Process

Inspire

An old, seasoned graphic design guru once said, “Before I start any project, I just look at a ton of stuff.”

And it’s true.

One way designers start their process is to look for inspiration in just about anything—photography, their surroundings, other artwork or design, magazines, books, even things that seem completely unrelated to the piece they’re designing.

Designers love inspiration and are always looking for it for their next project.

One awesome resource is Adobe’s Inspire magazine.

This free online magazine has monthly articles about useful tips and features for a wide range of Adobe products—from Photoshop to Edge Animate and more. It also typically showcases artists’ work, with a breakdown of their processes and different techniques they used.

Check out this personal favorite.

Enjoy, and be inspired!

5 Graphic Design Tips You Can Learn From Painting: Tip #5: The Key is To Do It – A Lot

5GraphicDesignTips-5

“You want to know the key to art?” an artist says, holding up a glass jar. After a closer look, it is apparent that inside the jar are hundreds of pencil stubs, worn to nothing but tip and eraser. “This is the key.”

Good painters improve their work simply by doing. They make a painting, good or bad, and then they set it aside, and make another. Then they make ten more. By constantly engaging in work (and observing), they are climbing uphill against the difficulties of their craft. Every mistake yields a new answer. Every dead-end opens a new drawer to learning and possibility. This is a great way to approach graphic design as well.

Make projects. Lots of them–and if you donʼt have a steady stream of client work, invent your own projects. Make them fun but also challenging. Pretend there is a client and set restrictions in place. Donʼt worry, all designers will tell you—the restrictions will make you more creative, not less. Then when youʼre done, print it or publish it, and move on. Make ten more. Donʼt compare your work to others and donʼt judge it too harshly. It will only discourage you from continuing on. Which once again, is the key: keep going. And of course, donʼt forget to have fun along the way.
 

GoPro Hero 3 Time Lapse

Blog Entry 4.3 [ print | web | video | illustration ]


 
Cameras are making it easier to produce compelling time lapse photography. We use the GoPro Hero 3 to generate our time lapse shots, and we have been blown away at the quality and ease of use the GoPro provides.

First, you need to get the settings right. For the time lapse example above, we set the camera to shoot a still frame every 30 seconds. The Hero 3 makes it easy to set your interval and gives you a number of options in the menu settings. You also want to make sure to set the size of your images. We set ours at 7 megapixels. You can go bigger, but it takes more space on your card and most of the time is not necessary. Set the camera to record and let it go (extended battery pack recommended otherwise the battery life will be limited).

Once you are satisfied that you have enough footage, take the GoPro and import your shots. Since we use Final Cut X, we created an event and imported all of the photos off the card. At this point, you can take out any of the shots you don’t want included in the time lapse. We ended up using over 220 images for this particular time lapse. Then, “select all” of the images in the event and drag them to the timeline. Final Cut automatically places them in the order they are shot. Next, you need to create a compound clip. This creates one giant clip with which to work. Re-time the clip, and you are done (we sped up this footage over 12,000%).

You end up with a great looking shot that can provide unique, visual interest for the story you are telling.