Best Part of the Job

The thing I love the most about video production is the opportunity to meet new people and learn new things on each and every project. Last month, we had the privilege of working on a video for the Global Down Syndrome Foundation. Each year the foundation selects a person with Down Syndrome to represent them at their Be Beautiful, Be Yourself Fashion Show. This year their ambassador was Steven Dulcie.

We flew down to Glen Rose, Texas to meet and spend time with the Dulcie family. We interviewed Steven’s parents Jeff and Deedra, along with his three brothers – David, Matthew and Gray. What a great family!

We also had the opportunity to interview some of the top scientists studying Down Syndrome, and specifically, the link between Down Syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease. It’s inspiring and encouraging to see the work they are putting it in day-by-day to learn more about these conditions.

Watch the video below.

 


 

Marketing Meets Motion Graphics

Utilizing motion graphics is a great way to market your business. Telling your story or walking a potential client through a step-by-step process without shooting a frame of video is proving to be a fun, effective avenue for companies who are looking to do something different.

We recently produced this video for a Colorado startup called Green Piranhas. We don’t need to explain much because the video says it all.

 


 

5 Graphic Design Tips You Can Learn From Painting: Tip #5: The Key is To Do It – A Lot

5GraphicDesignTips-5

“You want to know the key to art?” an artist says, holding up a glass jar. After a closer look, it is apparent that inside the jar are hundreds of pencil stubs, worn to nothing but tip and eraser. “This is the key.”

Good painters improve their work simply by doing. They make a painting, good or bad, and then they set it aside, and make another. Then they make ten more. By constantly engaging in work (and observing), they are climbing uphill against the difficulties of their craft. Every mistake yields a new answer. Every dead-end opens a new drawer to learning and possibility. This is a great way to approach graphic design as well.

Make projects. Lots of them–and if you donʼt have a steady stream of client work, invent your own projects. Make them fun but also challenging. Pretend there is a client and set restrictions in place. Donʼt worry, all designers will tell you—the restrictions will make you more creative, not less. Then when youʼre done, print it or publish it, and move on. Make ten more. Donʼt compare your work to others and donʼt judge it too harshly. It will only discourage you from continuing on. Which once again, is the key: keep going. And of course, donʼt forget to have fun along the way.